PGA National Homes For Sale – The Little Plan That Could

How did the transformation from Florida’s untamed wetlands to current day highly prized PGA National Homes for sale take place?

Palm Beach Gardens, the perfect place for PGA National homes, began as a piece of paper. In 1960, the US census recorded a population of one. This sole resident, a squatter by definition, was allowed by the developer, John MacArthur to continue living on the property he’d purchased for his dream garden community.

PGA National Homes and the PGA Resort and Spa share their history with Palm Beach Gardens and Palm Beach County, Florida. A story of intrigue and international influences from African American seeking refuge from Spanish and English slave owners to Spanish and English explorers and settlers trying to establish a profit in the new world. These impacted the lives of Native Americans for both good and bad as can be read in the works of the likes of Jonathan Dickinson.

The ultimate in Planned Communities, Palm Beach Gardens, the backdrop for PGA National homes, was first founded as nothing more than an idea and a paper document serving as its incoporation as a Garden City. The developer, John D. MacArthur was riding on the tide of growth in Florida that had been launced nearly sixty years before with the establishment of the “Florida East Coast Railway”, connecting Jacksonville to Key West. Prior to the railway, Florida served as a haven for Seminole Indians and their favored guests, African Americans whose lineage, escaped slaves, had taken refuge amongst the Seminoles who treated them kindly. Anyone living in “Spanish Florida” could expect un-pristine conditions and a life shared with the plants, insects and creatures of the mostly undeveloped environment. Exceptions were, of course, the larger costal cities including Miami and Palm Beach.

Although an oil and railroad business tycoon, MacArthur recognized the value of the beauty and natural settings of the area west of Palm Beach and wanted to develop it in a way that preserved its beauty. In tandem with his desire to build a garden-city, he chose the name, Palm Beach Gardens, after initially being refused the name, Palm Beach City, by the Florida legislature.
MacArthur’s vision of developing 4,000 acres to provide homes for 55,000 people gained traction, but slowly. A community without commercial components matched McArthur’s vision of a perfect place to live, but there were not 55,000 people who felt the same way enough to take up residence.

This changed with the establishment in 1988, of the 1.3 million square foot Gardens Mall. A flurry of development ensued as the conveniences of modern life close-at-hand could be assured to new residents.
The attraction of new development, serene homes in a natural setting and a dozen golf courses within the city created a boom and a high value on all the real estate and homes in the area. This value of PGA National homes and surrounding communities are a far cry from the 1913 sale of lots in nearby Pleasant City which could be obtained for $150 each, or the $1 an acre price paid by Irving Henry in 1880. Captain O. S. Porter became perhaps the state’s first “property flipper’ when he purchased the land from Henry and sold it to the founder of Standard Oil for $30,000, a powerful sum worth millions in today’s buying potential.

Today, PGA National homes surrounding the PGA National Resort and Spa are among the finest and most sought after family residences. Pristine communities in a way possible only in a planned garden community, yet affordable over a wide range of pricing and options. PGA National homes are the perfect fit for many.

Read more about the PGA National homes for sale and the resort community lifestyle on the community section of this website.


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